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  Topic Name: Necessary Tire Size on: October 26, 2016, 02:00:44 PM
Lentamentalisk


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« on: October 26, 2016, 02:00:44 PM »

How big of tires do you actually need for riding in the snow? Last winter I did plenty of riding on well packed hiking trails with 2.1" studded tires, and plenty of my friends were out on 38c studded tires doing just fine. But as soon as we got hit with fresh powder, I spent more time pushing than riding. For my N+1 I'd love to be able to ride in whatever weather VT throws my way, but also want to still have fun trail riding and bikepacking on rougher terrain in the summer.

My question is, is there any point in considering a plus bike for snow riding (I do weigh only 145lbs) or is it really not worth it until you get up to 4" or 5" tires?

If true fat is needed, I'm leaning towards something like a Surly Wednesday that I can run with 65mm rims with both 3" and <4" tires to fit both seasons.
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  Topic Name: Necessary Tire Size Reply #1 on: October 28, 2016, 09:55:51 PM
digibud


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« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2016, 09:55:51 PM »

The best I can tell you is that regardless of your weight, the fatter the tire you can put on and the lighter the bike you get, the more conditions you will be able to ride in. At your weight you won't need 5" tires often and maybe never depending on your conditions but I'd bet good money that at some point you'll find your 3" tires inadequate and at some point you'd find your 4" tires inadequate.  One big advantage of a bike capable of 5" tires is you can use whatever tire you want...and if you choose you can also build up a set of "plus" tires. I built up a set of 2.4" tires for my Fatback Corvus this summer that allowed me to use it on some dirt mountain rides.
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  Topic Name: Necessary Tire Size Reply #2 on: August 21, 2017, 05:47:05 AM
Lentamentalisk


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« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2017, 05:47:05 AM »

Followup:

I went out on a group  ride with a guy on a bike with 3" tires while everyone else was on 4-5" tires. He was friggin swimming like the snow was water. Couldn't make any progress. Everyone else was fine. Then again there were other days when my 4" tires couldn't keep me afloat, and I would have killed for 5" tires.

In the summer I swap out for a 29er wheelset and besides the comically wide Q-factor, I'm pretty happy.
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  Topic Name: Necessary Tire Size Reply #3 on: October 30, 2019, 07:39:46 AM
lambert


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« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2019, 07:39:46 AM »

The best I can tell you is that regardless of your weight, the fatter the tire you can put on and the lighter the bike you get, the more conditions you will be able to ride in. At your weight you won't need 5" tires often and maybe never depending on your craps casino game bet good money that at some point you'll find your 3" tires inadequate and at some point you'd find your 4" tires inadequate.  One big advantage of a bike capable of 5" tires is you can use whatever tire you want...and if you choose you can also build up a set of "plus" tires. I built up a set of 2.4" tires for my Fatback Corvus this summer that allowed me to use it on some dirt mountain rides.
I agree with you.
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