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  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... on: September 12, 2012, 09:58:11 AM
Colorado Cool Breeze


Location: Colorado
Posts: 271


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« on: September 12, 2012, 09:58:11 AM »

Hi All,
I am by no means an expert when it comes to bikepacking but I thought I'd share what I carry
on my bike for a 1-3 day trip in the Colorado back country. Expected temp range for the high country 85F to 40F.
I hope you find it interesting and I look forward to any questions or comments.
Thanks



Front handlebar bag: 4.2 lbs.
45auto, sunscreen, bug spray, ipod with accessories, headlamp battery
clear goggles(nite riding) camera with accessories.


Outdoor Research Dry Bag:  3.6 lbs.
Sleeping bag, underquilt, light down jacket, gloves and down hat.


Left pannier: 7.0 lbs.
water treatment and storage, raincoat, rain chaps, zip-on pant legs, LS shirt, silk top bottoms.





Right pannier: 9.0 lbs.
bike toolkit, alky stove cookkit,  foodbag, hammock with tree straps, tarp.









TOTAL weight of bikepacking gear 24 lbs.
This does not include water or additional food.

I also carry a camelbak MULE with the majority of my water, wallet car keys, etc.

All that stuff unpacked and in use.


I hope you found this article interesting.
I am a gear junky and absolutely love looking at and discussing bikepacking gear.
thanks






« Last Edit: October 09, 2012, 07:45:13 AM by Colorado Cool Breeze » Logged

  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #1 on: September 12, 2012, 02:19:23 PM
hjknox


Location: Durango, CO
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« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2012, 02:19:23 PM »

It's nice to see it broken down like this. Pretty light set up. I'm digging the alcohol stove especially. I've been considering switching up my cooking system to something lighter (I have a jetboil flash), and think I'll either go with something like this or with Esbit cubes (the fuel of the gods).

Thanks for sharing!
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  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #2 on: September 13, 2012, 09:14:45 AM
annoying crack


Location: brussels
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« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2012, 09:14:45 AM »

Just don't forget to leave the gun at home if ever you would have interest of exploring another country.  Wink
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  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #3 on: September 13, 2012, 09:25:02 AM
Colorado Cool Breeze


Location: Colorado
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« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2012, 09:25:02 AM »

It's nice to see it broken down like this. Pretty light set up. I'm digging the alcohol stove especially. I've been considering switching up my cooking system to something lighter (I have a jetboil flash), and think I'll either go with something like this or with Esbit cubes (the fuel of the gods).

Thanks for sharing!

Hi hjknox,
Thanks, I had just received the new panniers and kinda wanted to know the weight of everything so I thought why not photograph my process.
I was very surprised and happy on the total weight. 

Stoves:
I also use a canister type stove when we have fire bans in Colorado. I believe it's an MSR.
The alky stoves are my favorite. The one in the picture is called a caldera cone it comes with a pop can alky stove
and a titanium wind screen that you could build a stick(wood) fire in if you ran out of alky.
Most of the time when I am bikepacking I just need to boil water, so big cookkits is not required.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2012, 09:34:02 AM by Colorado Cool Breeze » Logged

  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #4 on: September 13, 2012, 02:26:23 PM
jhl99

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« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2012, 02:26:23 PM »

Bob:

Many of the people on this forum have a bias against pannier setups.  Can you describe the typical surfaces that you ride on?  Have you ever had rack/pannier failure?

I run panniers.. 2 small ones on either a front rack or a front low riders and  small one off a rack in the back.... bulky stuff on top of the rack.  I've had minimal issues.  In fact, on rocky, east coast terrain, the added weight helps keep the bike from bouncing all over. 
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  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #5 on: September 13, 2012, 03:16:46 PM
TobyGadd


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« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2012, 03:16:46 PM »

Nice setup, thanks for sharing. A lot of people have baseless prejudices against panniers, so it's nice to see someone making good use of them. This year I went with a contemporary rackless system for the CTR, and it was a little lighter. I haven't totally abandoned my panniers though--I have a feeling that they will reappear on a future ride...

What's with the gun? I can't think of many things that need to be shot in the Colorado mountains!
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http://tobygadd.blogspot.com/
"Do. It. Yourself. Dammit." -- overheard grumblings from Toby's lair.

  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #6 on: September 14, 2012, 07:59:38 AM
Colorado Cool Breeze


Location: Colorado
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« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2012, 07:59:38 AM »

Bob:

Many of the people on this forum have a bias against pannier setups.  Can you describe the typical surfaces that you ride on?  Have you ever had rack/pannier failure?

I run panniers.. 2 small ones on either a front rack or a front low riders and  small one off a rack in the back.... bulky stuff on top of the rack.  I've had minimal issues.  In fact, on rocky, east coast terrain, the added weight helps keep the bike from bouncing all over.  



HaHa as a new member here I sure don't want to jump into the middle of that debate.
IMO both have there place depending on where you ride and how much do you want to carry.

The in-thing right now is the under the seat packs, handlebar bags, and frame pack,
which I do like, however they have their issues if you prefer a full suspension bike like me.
I am currently rigging my downhill bike with that type of kit for a little bike packing where rocks and roots are more plentiful.

Just received the handlebar bag and I'm having issue with the cables. Need a under the seat bag
but will use this until I can afford one or I might try one of those rear Freeload Racks with a drybag.
That would help with lowering the center of gravity. Everything so high on the bike has me a bit worried.

Most of the trails I ride/ bikepack is dirt single track, like the Colorado Trail,
Front Range Open Space that allow mtn bikes and camping.
Typical trail:


I also like panniers on concrete bike path trips. It's really fun exploring ones city via the bike paths.

On pannier/rack failures. I went over the handle bars once in Golden Gate State Park and my Blackburn rear frame bent.
I had to remove it on the trail, using a big rock, bend it back in shape.
I them replaced it with a OMM which looks stronger that my bike frame. The Cannondale panniers survived with no issues.





« Last Edit: October 08, 2012, 06:31:46 PM by Colorado Cool Breeze » Logged

  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #7 on: September 14, 2012, 08:33:39 AM
Colorado Cool Breeze


Location: Colorado
Posts: 271


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« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2012, 08:33:39 AM »

Nice setup, thanks for sharing. A lot of people have baseless prejudices against panniers, so it's nice to see someone making good use of them. This year I went with a contemporary rackless system for the CTR, and it was a little lighter. I haven't totally abandoned my panniers though--I have a feeling that they will reappear on a future ride...

What's with the gun? I can't think of many things that need to be shot in the Colorado mountains!


Hi TobyGadd,
Thank you for posting and keeping the discussion going.
As a gear junky I love talking about bikes and accessories that allow us to get out and enjoy them a little longer.
Have you posted a picture of your current bike setup? I'd love to see it. I'll try a search on your handle to see if anything comes up.
I'm still kinda new to forums like this so I'm still learning my way around.

For me, panniers or no panniers it all depends on how much you want/need to carry, what type of terrain will you be riding on, what weather will you be expecting.
How long will you be out there or between supplies.
For me bikepacking is 1-3 days unsupported, in the Colorado Back Country riding single track. Average distance traveled 15-20 miles.
I enjoy the camping and day hiking from a basecamp as much a peddling so there usually no set schedule.

I'm kinda old(58) and really like having a few more creature comforts when I bikepack as well as a few extra cloths to keep warm.
Colorado weather can really change a lot in 24 hours. A typical temp swing without a storm can be 80F to 40F. Add wind and rain...OH my.

The guns is just a big noise maker it beats banging two pots together.

EDIT:  Just read your blog Toby on racing the Colorado Trail and saw a pict of your bike.
Wow very nice setup and I really enjoyed reading your blog thank you (refer: http://tobygadd.blogspot.com/2012/08/2012-colorado-trail-race-gear.html )
I must say in the world of bikepacking you and I are on opposite ends of the spectrum and I find that kinda cool that this hobby is so diverse.

« Last Edit: September 14, 2012, 09:30:14 AM by Colorado Cool Breeze » Logged

  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #8 on: September 14, 2012, 09:49:09 AM
TobyGadd


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« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2012, 09:49:09 AM »

Hey Breeze,

Here's some stuff that I wrote about racks and panniers a couple years go:
http://tobygadd.blogspot.com/2011/01/panniers-for-2011.html

When it comes right down to it, bikepacking is a blast--whether focusing on speed or comfort. I really like your style of day-hiking from camp!
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http://tobygadd.blogspot.com/
"Do. It. Yourself. Dammit." -- overheard grumblings from Toby's lair.

  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #9 on: September 14, 2012, 12:50:39 PM
goldenboy


Posts: 66


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« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2012, 12:50:39 PM »

Your kit looks pretty similar, a few notes:
-there is a bug spray / sunscreen combo made by bull frog
-I like more calories, that looks like about a 1/2 day's worth
-water filter vs. multiple bottles

thanks for the good post
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enthusiasm>ability

  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #10 on: September 15, 2012, 05:49:03 AM
LiiT


Posts: 35


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« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2012, 05:49:03 AM »

I love looking  at gear
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  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #11 on: September 15, 2012, 10:33:08 AM
Chunt


Location: Atlanta, Ga
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« Reply #11 on: September 15, 2012, 10:33:08 AM »

Thanks for posting. Nice breakdown of gear. Absolutely dig the fact that you put the temp (low-hi) range on the kit as well.
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  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #12 on: September 16, 2012, 08:05:56 PM
Colorado Cool Breeze


Location: Colorado
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« Reply #12 on: September 16, 2012, 08:05:56 PM »

I love looking  at gear


Me to I sure wish this forum was a bit more active.
It's kinda like watching grass grow. I do a lot of that being retired. haha
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  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #13 on: September 20, 2012, 12:52:18 PM
ChrisE


Location: Yorkshire Dales, UK
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« Reply #13 on: September 20, 2012, 12:52:18 PM »

This is my list.  I tour in the Alps (Europe), 600-3200m (say 2000 to 11,000ft).  Stay in mountain huts more than tents or bivis,

Hope it helps or gives some ideas


2no shorts (1 wear, 1 carry)   145+220g
2no cycle shirts (1wear, 1carry)   159+164g
2pr thin socks (1wear, 1carry)   35+45+46g
1pr longs   307g
1 base layer   163g
1 cycle coat   307g
1 helmet   
Gloves   75g
Balaclava   
2no inner tubes   2x94g
Pump   93g
LED micro light   28g
Micro red light on bike   15g
Puncture patches   6g
Set spare brake pads (2 prs)   2x18g
Pen and notebook   60g
Mobile phone   137g
Shades   19g
Contact lenses   15x4g
Ear plugs, 4pr   4x1g
Razors (6)   43g
Small sun cream   120g
Tooth brush & paste   14 + 12g
Soap   12g
Camelbak   249g
Paraglider line   5g
Passport   35g
Credit cards & cash   
BMC card   2g
Activcard insurance card   5g
Energy bars   
Isostar powder   195g
Chain oil   81g
Maps   377g
Camera   
Micro USB charger for phone   19g+13g
Space blanket   
Compass   16g
Contact list   
Tube Sudacrem   38g
Bike computer   
Clip for map on handlebars   
Whistle   10g
Boarding card for return   
Bin bags (for packing bike in if argued at airport)   
Labels for bike return   
Spare spokes (specific Mavic UST)   21g
Spare headtorch batteries   7g
Warm gloves   49g
Spare jockey bearing   7g
Solar charger   70g
Tyre levers   2x12g
Buff   34g
Tissue (toilet)   27g
Winter gloves   51g
Fleeces   240+260g
Disco pants   168g
Contact lens mirror   7g
   
bike   11050g
   
   
   
Shared equipment   
Multitool, 1 between 2   104g
Spare 5mm and 2mm alen keys   
8mm Allen extension   8g
Selection cable ties (incl some massive ones)   51g
Michelin map(s) yellow series for overall area   87g
Cassette removal tool   30g
Selection bolts nuts etc   92g
2 spare chainring bolts   
Superglue   
First aid stuff 1 between 2 incl steristrips, loads steriwipes   137g
Spare spokes   28g
Knife   
Sewing kit   
Shock pump   
Spare gear cable   19g
Spare chain links plus 2 spare Sram connectors   
French and Italian phrase books   
Roll insulation tape   
1m gaffer tape   17g
Spare phone battery   29g
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  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #14 on: September 20, 2012, 02:37:48 PM
Slim


Location: Duluth MN, North Central USA
Posts: 240


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« Reply #14 on: September 20, 2012, 02:37:48 PM »

Colorado cool breeze:

Thanks for posting, and nice way to do it, with the pics.

Here are some ideas to lighten up, if you are interested, if not, just ignore it, then it's for others:

That's a lot of sun and bug dope for 3 day, find tiny containers or repackage into new containers.

Instead of the nalgene bottles bring Platypus collapsible ones, much lighter (about 1.5 oz for the same 2 liters you got in those two bottles together) plus, when not full, it doesn't take up all that space, and can be used for other things.

Gun holster and camera pouch, get creative with some windshield sunshade material and duck tape.

Not to start a second amendment discussion, but just for weight, ditch the gun.

Swap CO2 for a mini pump. I don't like pumping either, but it's lighter and will work an unlimited number of times.

No inner tube(s)?

I take that quicklink out of the shop packaging, it will eventually wear through the cardboard back and you will loose one half, rendering it useless. (Yes, I do speak from experience ;-(
« Last Edit: September 20, 2012, 09:07:01 PM by Slim » Logged

  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #15 on: September 21, 2012, 08:21:45 AM
Colorado Cool Breeze


Location: Colorado
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« Reply #15 on: September 21, 2012, 08:21:45 AM »

Your kit looks pretty similar, a few notes:
-there is a bug spray / sunscreen combo made by bull frog
-I like more calories, that looks like about a 1/2 day's worth
-water filter vs. multiple bottles

thanks for the good post

Hi goldenboy,
Thanks for posting. I probably should have written a bit more on the food.
I did not include the complete menu in the photo since every trip is a little different.
These were more of the backup emergency supplies that live in my pannier.

On filtering vs bottles. For me it just depends on how close to water will I be riding. I actually enjoy filtering
my water vs bringing it from home. When I bikepack I am not interested in cranking out the miles. I like stopping and
doing stuff like filtering water. The MSR mini filter really makes just about any water source taste good.

I'll look into the bulfrog sun/bug screen that sounds interesting.
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  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #16 on: September 21, 2012, 08:27:32 AM
Colorado Cool Breeze


Location: Colorado
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« Reply #16 on: September 21, 2012, 08:27:32 AM »

This is my list.  I tour in the Alps (Europe), 600-3200m (say 2000 to 11,000ft).  Stay in mountain huts more than tents or bivis,

Hope it helps or gives some ideas

Hi ChrisE,
Wow! You weighed everything. Pretty cool.
I really like looking at lists because it gives me ideas of items I might not have thought to bring or away
to possibly combine items (multi use) thanks for taking the time to post your list and weights.
Do you have any pictures of you bikepacking kit?
« Last Edit: October 09, 2012, 07:47:11 AM by Colorado Cool Breeze » Logged

  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #17 on: September 21, 2012, 08:38:21 AM
Colorado Cool Breeze


Location: Colorado
Posts: 271


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« Reply #17 on: September 21, 2012, 08:38:21 AM »

Colorado cool breeze:

Thanks for posting, and nice way to do it, with the pics.

Here are some ideas to lighten up, if you are interested, if not, just ignore it, then it's for others:

That's a lot of sun and bug dope for 3 day, find tiny containers or repackage into new containers.

Instead of the nalgene bottles bring Platypus collapsible ones, much lighter (about 1.5 oz for the same 2 liters you got in those two bottles together) plus, when not full, it doesn't take up all that space, and can be used for other things.

Gun holster and camera pouch, get creative with some windshield sunshade material and duck tape.

Not to start a second amendment discussion, but just for weight, ditch the gun.

Swap CO2 for a mini pump. I don't like pumping either, but it's lighter and will work an unlimited number of times.

No inner tube(s)?

I take that quicklink out of the shop packaging, it will eventually wear through the cardboard back and you will loose one half, rendering it useless. (Yes, I do speak from experience ;-(

Hi Slim,
The Italians use their hands to talk and I use pictures, haha
I think posts and articles really pop when pictures are included. It makes
reading a forum like this a lot more interesting for me.
Most if not all posts I start will have picts I'm just not that good with the written word.

Thanks for the suggestions and ideas for reducing weight. I do like to keep track of the weight
but I am not a weight weenie as some call them.
The journey is actually more important than the destination for me and I like a bit of comfort on that journey.

I know, I'm probably the complete opposite of most guys(trail racers) on here. I bikepack because I found
hiking and backpacking was just too slow and I can cover about 3 times the distance with the same effort.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2012, 07:47:54 AM by Colorado Cool Breeze » Logged

  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #18 on: September 21, 2012, 12:41:46 PM
Slim


Location: Duluth MN, North Central USA
Posts: 240


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« Reply #18 on: September 21, 2012, 12:41:46 PM »

I am also all about the journey but when that journey involves mountains, or even just hills ;-) it helps a lot to have less to carry.

I am also not a weight weeny and was mainly suggesting things that would drop weight without effecting comfort (like the softbottles and smaller amounts of goop).
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  Topic Name: What's in my bikepack bags... Reply #19 on: September 21, 2012, 07:05:35 PM
Colorado Cool Breeze


Location: Colorado
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« Reply #19 on: September 21, 2012, 07:05:35 PM »

I am also all about the journey but when that journey involves mountains, or even just hills ;-) it helps a lot to have less to carry.

I am also not a weight weeny and was mainly suggesting things that would drop weight without effecting comfort (like the softbottles and smaller amounts of goop).

Hi Slim,
Do you have any trip reports posted or articles on your bikepacking kit? Would love to see them.
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